Thought Leadership

Strategy |

Nomophobia: fear of losing signal, running out of battery, and losing sight of one’s phone

By Melissa Goss
Content Marketing Specialist

Serious question: would you rather…give up your toothbrush or cellphone for a whole week? One survey found that nearly a quarter of people (22%) would rather give up their toothbrush. Even if you don’t have full-fledged nomophobia, you’re probably familiar with the symptoms if you’ve gone an extended period of time—say, a few hours—without your cellphone.  Likewise, an IDC study found that 79% of smartphone users have their device on hand for the entire waking day, save for two hours.

With this addiction to increased dependence on mobile devices, more people are obviously reading email on-the-go. So why aren't email marketers optimizing all of their campaigns for smaller screens? Recent Yesmail research reveals:

  • 1% of marketers send only responsive emails
  • 24% send mostly responsive emails (half or more emails sent are responsive)
  • 44% send some responsive emails (less than half of emails sent are responsive)
  • 31% don’t send responsive emails

Another striking finding from this analysis includes a notable difference (21%) in click-to-open rates for mobile emails that are responsive versus mobile emails that follow the status quo.

So while the money and time spent implementing responsive design may be a deterrent for some marketers, it pays off in the end since it combats the fact that 63% of consumers will close and forget about or delete an email that isn’t mobile-friendly. Responsive design utilizes CSS media queries to automatically adapt an email’s layout to the screen the message is opened on. This adjustment improves the user experience since customers won’t have to pinch and scroll a lot to read a brand’s email on their mobile device.

Even if companies don’t have the bandwidth to incorporate responsive design in their mobile email marketing initiatives, there’s still scalable design. Matt Caldwell, VP of Creative & Agency Services, recently told Mobile Marketer: “Scalability means it is an easily pumped up layout. That means bigger type, bigger buttons and bigger white space – and you are keeping the overall email at 600 pixels wide or less.” It’s important to note that responsive and scalable designs aren’t mutually exclusive, meaning both techniques can be used at once.  Regardless, catering email communications to mobile users can provide a more optimal viewing experience, improve engagement, and drive people to act on marketing messages.

For more insights on mobile email strategies, download the whitepaper Think Mobile-First: Tailoring Email Marketing to On-the-Go Consumers.

Author Bio

Melissa Goss

Melissa helps companies make more strategic decisions around their marketing campaigns by providing content that spans blog and social media posts to white papers and case studies. Prior to Yesmail, she focused on search engine marketing and social advertising at online retailer ModCloth. Melissa graduated from Northwestern University with a B.A. in Communication Studies, a minor in Business and a certificate in Integrated Marketing Communications.

Content Marketing Specialist

Melissa Goss

Melissa helps companies make more strategic decisions around their marketing campaigns by providing content that spans blog and social media posts to white papers and case studies. Prior to Yesmail, she focused on search engine marketing and social advertising at online retailer ModCloth. Melissa graduated from Northwestern University with a B.A. in Communication Studies, a minor in Business and a certificate in Integrated Marketing Communications.